An Address Delivered in The Court-House In Concord, Massachusetts, On 1st August, 1844, on the ANNIVERSARY OF THE EMANCIPATION OF THE NEGROES IN THE BRITISH WEST INDIES. R. W. Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson.
An Address Delivered in The Court-House In Concord, Massachusetts, On 1st August, 1844, on the ANNIVERSARY OF THE EMANCIPATION OF THE NEGROES IN THE BRITISH WEST INDIES.
An Address Delivered in The Court-House In Concord, Massachusetts, On 1st August, 1844, on the ANNIVERSARY OF THE EMANCIPATION OF THE NEGROES IN THE BRITISH WEST INDIES.
An Address Delivered in The Court-House In Concord, Massachusetts, On 1st August, 1844, on the ANNIVERSARY OF THE EMANCIPATION OF THE NEGROES IN THE BRITISH WEST INDIES.

An Address Delivered in The Court-House In Concord, Massachusetts, On 1st August, 1844, on the ANNIVERSARY OF THE EMANCIPATION OF THE NEGROES IN THE BRITISH WEST INDIES.

Boston: James Munroe and Company, 1844. 1st Edition. Wraps. 8vo - over 7¾ - 9¾" tall. Very Good. Item #005097

1st edition, with "Second Thousand" on the front wrapper. A Very Good copy. 8vo., 34 pp. In tan printed wrappers. The wrappers have a small chip at the spine's crown, on the front and rear wrapper. Sun line visible on the front and rear wrap. A Very Good copy. *** Emerson's scathing condemnation of the American Slave Trade and institution. In keeping with his social views emphasizing the advance of human progress, Emerson locates his discussion of race slavery within the "history of mankind interests us only as it exhibits a steady gain in truth and right." With language that is by turns ironic and incensed, he discusses features of slavery -deprivation, disenfranchisement, ruin of families - that contradict such a social advance. Emerson enumerates the horrors of slavery and writes "the blood is anti-slavery: it runs cold in the veins: the stomach rises with disgust, and curses slavery." Progress, he argues, arrives through witness reports of these sights and ensuing political action. ***.

Price: $250.00